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Books About Medieval Cooking



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All the King's Cooks: The Tudor Kitchens of King Henry VIII at Hampton Place
Peter Brears
Southover Press
ISBN: 0285635336

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Publisher's Notes:
Highlighting the world's first professional kitchen, this volume showcases the massive galleys at Hampton Court Palace. Illustrating how kitchens originally built to supply the entire household of King Henry VIII were run, this guide dispels many of the misconceptions about the table manners, quality of cooking, and serving of meals in Tudor England. Authentic recipes - adapted for modern kitchens - from the period are featured, including Chicken Farced, Smothered Rabbit, and White Leach. Accentuated with striking visuals, this history revives the sights, sounds, and smells of the Tudor kitchen while conveying the daily life of the era's rich and poor.





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Anglo-saxon Food & Drink
Ann Hagen
Anglo-Saxon Books
ISBN: 1898281416

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Publisher's Notes:
The two earlier books A Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Food and A Second Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Food & Drink have been brough together in one volume. This provides a vast amount of information (544 pages) at a reasonable price.

A picture is provided of how food was grown, conserved, prepared and eaten during the period from the beginning of the 5th century to the 11th century.

Food production for home consumption was the basis of economic activity throughout the Anglo-Saxon period and ensuring access to an adequate food supply was a constant preoccupation. Used as payment and a medium of trade, food was the basis of the Anglo-Saxons' system of finance and administration. Information from literary and archaeological sources has been brought together for the first time to give insights into this important aspect of Anglo-Saxon life.

The west of Britain is also covered.

An extensive index enables the reader to quickly find specific information.





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Arranging the Meal: A History of Table Service in France
Jean-Louis Flandrin
University of California Press
ISBN: 0520238850

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Publisher's Notes:
The sequence in which food has been served at meals has changed greatly over the centuries and has also varied from one country to another, a fact noted in virtually every culinary history. Most food writers have treated the more significant alterations as stand-alone events. The most famous example of such a change occurred in the nineteenth century, when service à la française - in which the stunning presentation made a great show but diners had to wait to be served - gave way to service à la russe, in which platters were passed among diners who served themselves. But in Arranging the Meal, the late culinary historian Jean-Louis Flandrin argues that such a change in the order of food service is far from a distinct event. Instead he regards it as a historical phenomenon, one that happened in response to socioeconomic and cultural factors - another mutation in an ever-changing sequence of customs. As France's most illustrious culinary historian, Flandrin has become a cult figure in France, and this posthumous book is not only his final word but also a significant contribution to culinary scholarship. A foreword by Beatrice Fink places Flandrin's work in context and offers a personal remembrance of this French culinary hero.





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Art, Culture, and Cuisine: Ancient and Medieval Gastronomy
Phyllis Pray Bober
University Of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226062546

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Publisher's Notes:
In Art, Culture, and Cuisine, Phyllis Pray Bober examines cooking through an assortment of recipes as well as the dual lens of archaeology and art history. Believing that the unity of a culture extends across all forms of expression, Bober seeks to understand the minds and hearts of those who practiced cookery or consumed it as reflected in the visual art of the time.

Bober draws on archaeology and art history to examine prehistoric eating customs in ancient Turkey; traditions of the great civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome; and rituals of the Middle Ages. Both elegant and entertaining, Art, Culture, and Cuisine reveals cuisine and dining's place at the heart of cultural, religious, and social activities that have shaped Western sensibilities.





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The Art of Cookery in the Middle Ages
Terence Scully
Boydell Press
ISBN: 0851154301

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Publisher's Notes:
A compendium on practically all aspects of the art of cooking and dining... Because of the author's familiarity with all aspects of the subject we are offered this rara avis: a book which interests the specialist and the general reader; which allies common sense with scholarship; and which presents the theory and practice of medieval cooking for the scholar and the practitioner... has its place on the shelves of the practical cook as well as on those of the scholar: both can feed on it! HISTORY The master cook who worked in the noble kitchens of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries had to be both practical and knowledgeable. His apprenticeship acquainted him with a range of culinary skills and a wide repertoire of seasonal dishes, but he was also required to understand the inherent qualities of the foodstuffs he handled, as determined by contemporary medical theories, and to know the lean-day strictures of the Church. Research in original manuscript sources makes this a fascinating and authoritative study where little hard fact had previously existed.





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Cheese, Pears, and History in a Proverb
Massimo Montanari (Author), Beth Archer Brombert (Translator)
Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231152515

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Publisher's Notes:
"Do not let the peasant know how good cheese is with pears" goes the old saying. Intrigued by these words and their portent, Massimo Montanari unravels their origin and utility. Perusing archival cookbooks, agricultural and dietary treatises, literary works, and anthologies of beloved sayings, he finds in the nobility's demanding palates and delicate stomachs a compelling recipe for social conduct.

At first, cheese and its visceral, earthy pleasures were treated as the food of Polyphemus, the uncivilized man-beast. The pear, on the other hand, became the symbol of ephemeral, luxuriant pleasure-an indulgence of the social elite. Joined together, cheese and pears adopted an exclusive savoir faire, especially as the "natural phenomenon" of taste evolved into a cultural attitude. Montanari's delectable history straddles written and oral traditions, economic and social relations, and thrills in the power of mental representation. His ultimate discovery shows that the enduring proverb, so wrapped up in history, operates not only as a repository of shared wisdom but also as a rich locus of social conflict.





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Concordance of English Recipes: Thirteenth through Fifteenth Centuries
Constance B. Hieatt, Terry Nutter, Johnna H. Holloway
Arizona Center for Medieval and Rennaissance Studies
ISBN: 0866983570

OUT OF PRINT

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Publisher's Notes:
This work is a concordance to culinary recipes recorded in England in the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries: the earliest English culinary recipes on record. A few of medieval origin which continued to be recorded in the 16th and 17th centuries appear in an appendix. The recipes listed have all appeared in print; unpublished manuscripts known to the authors have been excluded since most readers would be unable to refer to them. Recipes are listed under their titles as they appear in the source manuscripts, collated in order alphabetically under their lemmatized recipe names.





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Cooking & Dining in Medieval England
Peter Brears
Prospect Books
ISBN: 1903018552

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Publisher's Notes:
The history of medieval food and cookery has received a fair amount of attention from the point of view of recipes (of which many survive)and of the general context of feasts and feasting. It has never, as yet, been studied with an eye to the real mechanics of food production and service: the equipment used, the household organisation, the architectural arrangements for kitchens, store-rooms, pantries, larders, cellars, and domestic administration. This new work by Peter Brears, perhaps Britain's foremost expert on the historical kitchen, looks at these important elements of cooking and dining. He also subjects the many surviving documents relating to food service - household ordinances, regulations and commentaries - to critical study in an attempt to reconstruct the precise rituals and customs of dinner.

An underlying intention is to rehabilitate the medieval Englishman as someone with a nice appreciation of food and cookery, decent manners, and a delicate sense of propriety and seemliness. To dispel the myth, that is, of medieval feasting as an orgy of gluttony and bad manners, usually provided with meat that has gone slightly off, masked by liberal additions of heady spices.

A series of chapters looks at the cooking departments in large households:the counting house, dairy, brewhouse, pastry, boiling house and kitchen. These are illustrated by architectural perspectives of surviving examples in castles and manor houses throughout the land. Then there are chapters dealing with the various sorts of kitchen equipment: fires, fuel, pots and pans. Sections are then devoted to recipes and types of food cooked. The recipes are those which have been used and tested by Peter Brears in hundreds of demonstrations to the public and cooking for museum displays. Finally there are chapters on the service of dinner (the service departments including the buttery, pantry and ewery) and the rituals that grew up around these. Here, Peter Brears has drawn a wonderful strip cartoon of the serving of a great feast (the washing of hands, the delivery of napery, the tasting for poison, etc.) which will be of permanent utility to historical re-enactors who wish to get their details right.





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Cooking in Europe, 1250-1650
Ken Albala
Greenwood Press
ISBN: 0313330964

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Publisher's Notes:
Ever get a yen for hemp seed soup, digestive pottage, carp fritters, jasper of milk, or frog pie? Would you like to test your culinary skills whipping up some edible counterfeit snow or nun's bozolati? Perhaps you have an assignment to make a typical Renaissance dish. The cookbook presents 171 unadulterated recipes from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Elizabethan era. Most are translated from French, Italian, or Spanish into English for the first time. Some English recipes from the Elizabethan era are presented only in the original if they are close enough to modern English to present an easy exercise in translation. Expert commentary helps readers to be able to replicate the food as nearly as possible in their own kitchens.

An introduction overviews cuisine and food culture in these time periods and prepares the reader to replicate period food with advice on equipment, cooking methods, finding ingredients, and reading period recipes. The recipes are grouped by period and then type of food or "course." Three lists of recipes-organized by how they appear in the book and by country and by special occasions-in the frontmatter help to quickly identify the type of dish desired. Some recipes will not appeal to modern tastes or sensibilities. This cookbook does not sanitize them for the modern palate. Most everything in this book is perfectly edible and, according to the author, noted food historian Ken Albala, delicious!





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Cooking & Dining in Tudor & Early Stuart England
Peter Brears
Prospect Books
ISBN: 1909248320

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Publisher's Notes:
The first volume of Peter Brears’ history of English cookery covered the Middle Ages. It was so good that it won outright the André Simon Award for the best food book of 2009. This will be even better. It treats of an heroic period in English history when new foods were reaching our shores from the New World, and new styles of cooking were being adopted from France and Italy. Even more important, it’s a period that has barely been touched upon by previous accounts. What is unique about Brears’ book is that he combines an account of the cookery with a close look at the practical arrangements, the kitchens and dining halls, where that food was cooked and consumed. His prose is enlivened by his drawings – as accurate as can be – which lay bare to the modern reader just what was going on in places like Hampton Court palace, as well as in humbler homes throughout the land. There are plenty of recipes for those who like to try things for themselves, all properly tested by the author, who is a historic food consultant to TV and country house owners.The era begins with the near medieval styles of Henry VII and VIII, with special attention to Henry VIII’s propagandizing banquets and feasts for foreign monarchs; progresses to the reign of Elizabeth, the effects of new foodstuffs from America, and treats some the great houses of the Tudor aristocracy; and finishes with the first two Stuart kings, James I and Charles I under whose rule we began to move towards a more modern style of cooking and when we also started to produce cookery books in large number.Peter Brears is former Director of the Leeds City Museums and one of England’s foremost authorities on domestic artifacts and historical kitchens and cooking technology. This year he is also publishing Traditional Food in Yorkshire with Prospect Books.





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The Culture of Food in England, 1200-1500
C. M. Woolgar
Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300181914

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Publisher's Notes:
In this revelatory work of social history, C. M. Woolgar shows that food in late-medieval England was far more complex, varied, and more culturally significant than we imagine today. Drawing on a vast range of sources, he charts how emerging technologies as well as an influx of new flavors and trends from abroad had an impact on eating habits across the social spectrum. From the pauper’s bowl to elite tables, from early fad diets to the perceived moral superiority of certain foods, and from regional folk remedies to luxuries such as lampreys, Woolgar illuminates desire, necessity, daily rituals, and pleasure across four centuries.





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An Early Meal - a Viking Age Cookbook & Culinary Odyssey
D. Serra, H. Tunberg
ChronoCopia Publishing
ISBN: 9198105604

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Publisher's Notes:
"An Early Meal" takes the reader on journey to discover the food culture of Viking Age Scandinavia. In the first part of the book one will learn about what and how the food was cooked and eaten. These facts are illuminated in the second part, which is a cookbook containing forty-two delicious recipes from seven different Viking Age settlements. Both parts of the book are thoroughly based on archaeological finds, historical cooking methods and current research. The two authors of the book have a long background in culinary history. Daniel Serra is working on a doctoral thesis on Viking Age food culture and is an experimental culinary archaeologist. Hanna Tunberg has a background as food connoisseur, taste expert and archaeologist.





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Early French Cookery: Sources, History, Original Recipes and Modern Adaptations
D. Eleanor Scully, Terrence Scully
University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472088777

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Publisher's Notes:
Early French Cookery introduces the general features of the food prepared for wealthy French households at the end of the Middle Ages. The volume presents over one hundred recipes, drawn from actual medieval manuscripts, and includes an overview of early French culinary traditions, foodstuffs, and methods of preparation. The authors help place these enticing recipes in context through a short survey of medieval dining behavior, and they give practical menu suggestions for simple meals and banquets that incorporate these delicious dishes.





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Eating Right in the Renaissance
Ken Albala
University of California Press
ISBN: 0520229479

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Publisher's Notes:
Eating right has been an obsession for longer than we think. Renaissance Europe had its own flourishing tradition of dietary advice. Then, as now, an industry of experts churned out diet books for an eager and concerned public. Providing a cornucopia of information on food and an intriguing account of the differences between the nutritional logic of the past and our own time, this inviting book examines the wide-ranging dietary literature of the Renaissance. Ken Albala ultimately reveals the working of the Renaissance mind from a unique perspective: we come to understand a people through their ideas on food.

Eating Right in the Renaissance takes us through an array of historical sources in a narrative that is witty and spiced with fascinating details. Why did early Renaissance writers recommend the herbs parsley, arugula, anise, and mint to fortify sexual prowess? Why was there such a strong outcry against melons and cucumbers, even though people continued to eat them in large quantities? Why was wine considered a necessary nutrient? As he explores these and other questions, Albala explains the history behind Renaissance dietary theories; the connections among food, exercise, and sex; the changing relationship between medicine and cuisine; and much more.

Whereas modern nutritionists may promise a slimmer waistline, more stamina, or freedom from disease, Renaissance food writers had entirely different ideas about the value of eating right. As he uncovers these ideas from the past, Ken Albala puts our own dietary obsessions in an entirely new light in this elegantly written and often surprising new chapter on the history of food.





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The Edible Monument: The Art of Food for Festivals
M. Reed, C. Bremer-David, J. Imorde, A. Willan
Getty Research Institute
ISBN: 1606064541

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Publisher's Notes:
The Edible Monument considers the elaborate architecture, sculpture, and floats made of food that were designed for court and civic celebrations in early modern Europe. These include popular festivals such as Carnival and the Italian Cuccagna. Like illuminations and fireworks, ephemeral artworks made of food were not well documented and were challenging to describe because they were perishable and thus quickly consumed or destroyed. In times before photography and cookbooks, there were neither literary models nor a repertoire of conventional images for how food and its preparation should be explained or depicted.

Although made for consumption, food could also be a work of art, both as a special attraction and as an expression of power. Formal occasions and spontaneous celebrations drew communities together, while special foods and seasonal menus revived ancient legends, evoking memories and recalling shared histories, values, and tastes.

Drawing on books, prints, and scrolls that document festival arts, elaborate banquets, and street feasts, the essays in this volume examine the mythic themes and personas employed to honor and celebrate rulers; the methods, materials, and wares used to prepare, depict, and serve food; and how foods such as sugar were transformed to express political goals or accomplishments.





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English Bread and Yeast Cookery
Elizabeth David
Penguin Books Ltd
ISBN: 0140299742

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Publisher's Notes:
In this universally acclaimed book Elizabeth David deals with all aspects of flour-milling, yeast, bread ovens and the different types of bread and flour available. The recipes cover yeast cookery of all kinds, and the many lovely, old-fashioned spiced breads, buns, pancakes and muffins, among others, are all described with her typical elegance and unrivalled knowledge.

Elizabeth David was the best food writer of her time, and even today is considered to be without peer. ENGLISH BREAD AND YEAST COOKERY was first published by Viking in 1977. Elizabeth David died in 1992.





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Fast and Feast: Food in Medieval Society
Bridget Ann Henisch
Pennsylvania State University Press
ISBN: 027100424X

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"Although it is neither a detective story nor primarily a humorous work, there are elements of each in this lively and scholarly book on the broader aspects of food in the Middle Ages... If you would like to know how and when people fasted,... you can read about it here. You can also learn when to spit and how to share a drinking vessel with your neighbor with some delicacy. What was a banquet like?...If you are intrigued by any of this and much more besides, this is the book for you." -- Petits Propos Culinaires





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Food and Eating in Medieval Europe
Martha Carlin (ed.) and Joel T. Rosenthal (ed.)
Hambledon Press
ISBN: 1852851481

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Publisher's Notes:
Eating and drinking are essential to life and therefore of great interest to the historian. As well as having a real fascination in their own right, both activities are an integral part of the both social and economic history. Yet food and drink, especially in the middle ages, have received less than their proper share of attention. The essays in this volume approach their subject from a variety of angles: from the reality of starvation and the reliance on 'fast food' of those without cooking facilities, to the consumption of an English lady's household and the career of a cook in the French royal household.





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Food in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays
Melitta Weiss Adamson (ed.)
Garland Publishing
ISBN: 0815313454

OUT OF PRINT

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Publisher's Notes:
The enormous interest in recent years in the role of food in history has inspired this scholarly and entertaining collection of ten newly commissioned articles by medievalists from North America, Europe, and Australia that examines the subject of medieval food from a variety of disciplines including English, French, and German literature, history, and history of medicine. Up to now, there had been no such collection of in-depth, cross-cultural studies on medieval food in a variety of culinary, literary, and religious texts. An introduction and subject index are provided.





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Food in Medieval England: Diet and Nutrition
C.M. Woolgar (Editor), D. Serjeantson (Editor), T. Waldron (Editor)
Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199563357

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Publisher's Notes:
Food and diet are central to understanding daily life in the middle ages. In the last two decades, the potential for the study of diet in medieval England has changed markedly: historians have addressed sources in new ways; material from a wide range of sites has been processed by zooarchaeologists and archaeobotanists; and scientific techniques, newly applied to the medieval period, are opening up possibilities for understanding the cumulative effects of diet on the skeleton. In a multi-disciplinary approach to the subject, this volume, written by leading experts in different fields, unites analysis of the historical, archaeological, and scientific record to provide an up-to-date synthesis. The volume covers the whole of the middle ages from the early Saxon period up to c .1540, and while the focus is on England wider European developments are not ignored.

The first aim of the book is to establish how much more is now known about patterns of diet, nutrition, and the use of food in display and social competition; its second is to promote interchange between the methodological approaches of historians and archaeologists. The text brings together much original research, marrying historical and archaeological approaches with analysis from a range of archaeological disciplines, including archaeobotany, archaeozoology, osteoarchaeology, and isotopic studies.





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Food in Medieval Times
Melitta Weiss Adamson
Greenwood
ISBN: 0313361762

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Publisher's Notes:
New light is shed on everyday life in the Middle Ages in Great Britain and continental Europe through this unique survey of its food culture. Students and other readers will learn about the common foodstuffs available, how and what they cooked, ate, and drank, what the regional cuisines were like, how the different classes entertained and celebrated, and what restrictions they followed for health and faith reasons. Fascinating information is provided, such as on imitation food, kitchen humor, and medical ideas. Many period recipes and quotations flesh out the narrative.

The book draws on a variety of period sources, including as literature, account books, cookbooks, religious texts, archaeology, and art. Food was a status symbol then, and sumptuary laws defined what a person of a certain class could eat—the ingredients and preparation of a dish and how it was eaten depended on a person's status, and most information is available on the upper crust rather than the masses. Equalizing factors might have been religious strictures and such diseases as the bubonic plague, all of which are detailed here.





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Food Through the Ages: From Stuffed Dormice to Pineapple Hedgehogs
Anna Selby
Remember When
ISBN: 1844680274

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Publisher's Notes:
With people's fascination for food increasing, there are more cookery shows and magazines than ever, Medieval banquets are sold-out events and classic recipes and ingredients are back in fashion, which is what this book sets out to explore. Highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each era from Roman times onwards. Anna recreates classic recipes from Epicurius' stuffed dormice to recipes which readers really will want to recreate. Anna explores how trade and improved transportation increased foodstuffs available and reflects on how we're returning to the old-fashioned notion of seasonal foods - just like our ancestors had to do.





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The Fruit, Herbs and Vegetables of Italy
Giacomo Castelvetro (Author), Gillian Riley (Translator)
Viking
ISBN: 1903018641

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Publisher's Notes:
This is a new edition of a classic of early 17th-century food writing. The book was written by the Italian refugee, educator, and humanist Giacomo Castelvetro, who had been saved from the clutches of the Inquisition in Venice by the English ambassador, Sir Dudley Carleton, in 1611. When he came to England, he was horrified by its preference for large helpings of meat, masses of sugar and very little greenstuff. The Italians were good gardeners, and had a familiarity with many varieties of vegetable and fruit that were as yet little-known in England. He circulated his Italian manuscript among his supporters, dedicating it to Lucy, Countess of Bedford, herself a keen gardener and patron of literature. Gillian Riley's translation of this hitherto unpublished document has been recognised as being fluent, entertaining and accurate from its first appearance in 1989. Castelvetro takes us through the gardener's year, listing the fruit and vegetables as they come into season, with simple and elegant ways of preparing them. Practical instructions are interspersed with tender vignettes of his life in his native city of Modena, memories of his years in Venice, and reminiscences of his travels in Europe. He writes of children learning to swim in the canals of the Brenta, strapped to huge dried pumpkins to keep them afloat; Venetian ladies ogling passers-by from behind screens of verdant beanstalks; sultry German wenches jealously hoarding their grape harvest; his intimate chats with Scandinavian royalty about the best way to graft pear cuttings and discomfort the Pope. At the time of Castelvetro's writing, English cooking was on a cusp. It had yet to absorb the new ways of Europe, although some of the best practice of Dutch and French gardening was having its effect on our diet. But there were still many new styles of cooking and recipes to absorb, as well as new plants to enjoy (for instance broccoli), and new ways to set them out on the table. This treatise anticipates many of the changes that were to come about over the next one hundred years. Castelvetro urged the English to eat more salads with the same enthusiasm evinced by John Evelyn in his 1699 book on salad-stuff.





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The Great Household in Late Medieval England
C. M. Woolgar
Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300076878

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
In the later medieval centuries, a whole range of important social, political, and artistic activities took place against the backdrop of the great English households. In this lively book, C. M. Woolgar explores the fascinating details of life in a great house. Based on extensive investigation of household accounts and related primary documents, Woolgar vividly illuminates the operations of great households. He also delineates the major changes that transformed the economy and geography of both lay and clerical households between 1200 and 1500.

In this portrait of aristocratic and gentry life in medieval England, Woolgar describes the roles of family members, the situations of servants, the uses of space within the household, food and drink for daily consumption and for special occasions, furnishing, clothing, arrangements for travel, household animals, cleanliness and hygiene, entertainment, the practices of religion, and intellectual life. The author also analyzes the qualitative and social evolution of great households as definitions of magnificence and conventions of etiquette became increasingly elaborate.





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How to Milk an Almond, Stuff an Egg, and Armor a Turnip
David Friedman, Elizabeth Cook
CreateSpace
ISBN: 1460924983

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
A book on medieval and renaissance cooking including more than 330 recipes, articles on how to do a feast, information on what ingredients were available when, and more.





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The Kitchen, Food, and Cooking in Reformation Germany
Volker Bach
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442251271

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
In international culinary history, Germany is still largely a blank space, its unparalleled wealth of source material and large body of published research available only to readers of German. This books aims to give everybody else an overview of German foodways at a crucial juncture in its history. The Reformation era, broadly speaking from the Imperial Reforms of the 1480s to the beginning of the Thirty Years’ War, laid the foundations for many developments in German culture, language, and history, not least the notion of its existence as a country. Understanding the food traditions and habits of the time is important to anyone studying Germany’s culinary history and identity.

Using original source material, food production, processing and consumption are explored with a view to the social significance of food and the practicalities of feeding a growing population. Food habits across the social spectrum are presented, looking at the foodways of rich and poor in city and country. The study shows a foodscape richly differentiated by region, class, income, gender and religion, but united by a shared culinary identity that was just beginning to emerge. An appendix of recipes helps the reader gain an appreciation of the practical aspects of food in the age of Martin Luther.

Reviews:
by Daniel Myers for "MedievalCookery.com"





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Living and Dining in Medieval Paris
Nicole Crossley-Holland
University Of Wales Press
ISBN: 0708316476

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
A richly detailed account of the culinary world of fourteenth-century Paris. At the centre of this account lies the Ménagier de Paris, a medieval manuscript covering all aspects of food preparation and household skills, written by a well-to-do knight for his fifteen-year-old wife. Through her meticulous study of the manuscript, Nicole Crossley-Holland paints a vivid picture of life in the knight's household: his city residence with its walled vegetable and herb garden; his home farm which provided meat and dairy produce; the country estate where he trained sparrowhawks and hunted wild boar.

The author gives a comprehensive description of medieval food economy. Methods of food preservation, cooking techniques, recipes and presentation are thoroughly explored. Menus, ranging from the simple and everyday to elaborate wedding feasts, are described in detail.





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The Medieval Cook
Bridget Ann Henisch
Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843834383

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
This book takes us into the world of the medieval cook, from the chefs in the great medieval courts and aristocratic households catering for huge feasts, to the peasant wife attempting to feed her family from scarce resources, from cooking at street stalls to working as hired caterers for private functions. It shows how they were presented in the art, literature and moral commentary of the period (valued on some grounds, despised on others), how they functioned, and how they coped with the limitations and the expectations which faced them in different social settings. Particular use is made of their frequent appearance in the margins of illuminated manuscript, whether as decoration, or as a teaching tool.





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The Medieval Kitchen
Odile Redon
University Of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226706850

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
The Medieval Kitchen is a delightful work in which historians Odile Redon, Françoise Sabban, and Silvano Serventi rescue from dark obscurity the glorious cuisine of the Middle Ages. Medieval gastronomy turns out to have been superb - a wonderful mélange of flavor, aroma, and color. Expertly reconstructed from fourteenth- and fifteenth-century sources and carefully adapted to suit the modern kitchen, these recipes present a veritable feast. The Medieval Kitchen vividly depicts the context and tradition of authentic medieval cookery.





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The Medieval Kitchen: A Social History with Recipes
Hannele Klemettillä
Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861899084

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
Contrary to what is often believed, good food was valued highly in the Middle Ages – the fragrance of exotic spices filled the air, meat turned on the spit and fish was consumed in abundance for religious reasons. The wealthy made a show of their prosperity by serving peacock or wild boar at banquets, while the poor ate vegetables, porridge and bread. Fresh and preserved fish, meat, fruit and vegetables were transported great distances to grace dining tables across Europe.

In The Medieval Kitchen, Hannele Klemettilä presents a richly illustrated history of medieval food and cookery in Western Europe and Scandinavia. The book is also a practicable cookbook, with a collection of more than 60 originally sourced recipes that can easily be prepared in today’s modern home. Hippocras, roasted veal paupiettes with bacon and herbs, and rose pudding tempt with the beguiling flavours of a bygone era.

The Medieval Kitchen corrects many common misconceptions about the food of the Middle Ages, and acquaints the reader with the food culture, customs and ideologies associated with eating in medieval times. The text is accompanied by many fine paintings and drawings, which help to evoke the atmosphere in the dining rooms and kitchens of both rich and poor some 600 years ago.

Hannele Klemettilä is a postdoctoral researcher of the Academy of Finland and a specialist in medieval cultural history. Her publications include monographs, books, articles and newspaper columns, and she has appeared on radio and television.





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Sacred Cow, Mad Cow: A History of Food Fears
Madeleine Ferrières
Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231131925

Available from:
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Publisher's Notes:
Contemporary concerns about food such as those stemming from mad cow disease, salmonella, and other potential food-related dangers are hardly new-humans have long been wary of what they eat. Beyond the fundamental fear of hunger, societies have sought to protect themselves from rotten, impure, or unhealthy food. From the markets of medieval Europe to the slaughterhouses of twentieth-century Chicago, Madeleine Ferrières traces the origins of present-day behavior toward what we eat as she explores the panics, myths, and ever-shifting attitudes regarding food and its safety. She demonstrates that food fears have been inspired not only by safety concerns but also by cultural, political, and religious prejudices.

Flour from human bones and pâté from dead cats are just two of the more unappetizing recipes that have scared consumers away from certain foods. Ferrières considers the roots of these and other rumors, illuminating how societies have assessed and attempted to regulate the risks of eating. She documents the bizarre and commonsensical attempts by European towns to ensure the quality of beef and pork, ranging from tighter controls on butchers to prohibiting Jews and menstruating women from handling meat. Examining the spread of Hungarian cattle disease, which ravaged the livestock of seventeenth-century Europe, Ferrières recounts the development of safety methods that became the Western model for fighting animal diseases.

Ferrières discusses a wealth of crucial and curious food-related incidents, trends, and beliefs, including European explorers' shocked responses to the foodways of the New World; how some foods deemed unsafe for the rich were seen as perfectly suitable for the poor; the potato's negative reputation; the fierce legal battles between seventeenth-century French bread bakers and innkeepers; the role of the medical profession in food regulation; and how modern consumerism changed the way we eat. Drawing on history, folklore, agriculture, and anthropology, Ferrières tells us how our decisions about what not to eat reflect who we are.





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The Shakespeare Cookbook
Andrew Dalby, Maureen Dalby
British Museum Press
ISBN: 0714123358

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Publisher's Notes:
Shakespeare's working life, from about 1590 to 1615, was not only a period of rich activity on the London stage, but also one of prolific writing and publishing about food. Shakespeare himself used food in many of his plays: from memorable banquet scenes, to the use of food and feasting as metaphor. This fascinating book explores the plays alongside contemporary recipes to offer modern‐day cooks a unique insight into daily life and gastronomy in Shakespeare's London.

A beautifully illustrated cookbook revealing what people were really eating in Shakespeare's time, featuring fifty original menus and recipes from 16th‐ and 17th‐century cookbooks, alongside food‐related quotes from Shakespeare's canon. Including fully‐tested modern day adaptations of all fifty recipes, this is an excellent resource for all those interested in history, cookery, literature and a wider approach to the world of Shakespeare.

The authors: Andrew Dalby is a classics scholar, linguist and food historian. Maureen Dalby is a retired teacher and a cook.





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The Spice Route: A History
John Keay
University of California Press
ISBN: 0520254163

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Publisher's Notes:
The Spice Route is one of history's greatest anomalies: shrouded in mystery, it existed long before anyone knew of its extent or configuration. Spices came from lands unseen, possibly uninhabitable, and almost by definition unattainable; that was what made them so desirable. Yet more livelihoods depended on this pungent traffic, more nations participated in it, more wars were fought for it, and more discoveries resulted from it than from any other global exchange. Epic in scope, marvelously detailed, laced with drama, The Spice Route spans three millennia and circles the world to chronicle the history of the spice trade. With the aid of ancient geographies, travelers' accounts, mariners' handbooks, and ships' logs, John Keay tells of ancient Egyptians who pioneered maritime trade to fetch the incense of Arabia, Graeco-Roman navigators who found their way to India for pepper and ginger, Columbus who sailed west for spices, de Gama, who sailed east for them, and Magellan, who sailed across the Pacific on the exact same quest. A veritable spice race evolved as the west vied for control of the spice-producing islands, stripping them of their innocence and the spice trade of its mystique. This enthralling saga, progressing from the voyages of the ancients to the blue-water trade that came to prevail by the seventeenth century, transports us from the dawn of history to the ends of the earth.





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Spices And Comfits: Collected Papers on Medieval Food
Johanna Maria Van Winter
Prospect Books
ISBN: 1903018455

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Publisher's Notes:
Throughout a long academic career in Holland, Johanna Maria van Winter has specialized in the study of food and drink in the Middle Ages. She has contributed several papers to learned journals and specialist conferences are gathered here within a single volume. The papers are printed for the most part in English but with some German and French texts.

The subjects break down into four groups: Medieval Food Habits; The Netherlands and their Neighbours; Fasting and Feasting; Food and Health. Invariably the work is founded on a close study of written sources, either the medieval records of towns and feudal lords of The Netherlands, early printed cookery books, or the best international scholarship.

Some of the topics discussed in this volume are: Fasting and asceticism in the Middle Ages; Fish recipes in late medieval and early modern cookery books; The use of cannabis in two cookery books of the fifteenth century; Green salads in the Renaissance; Invalid food in the fifteenth century; Regional cookery of the Low Countries in the later Middle Ages; Festive meals; Dining as a means of communication; The role of preserved food in Dutch medieval households.





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The Taste of Conquest: The Rise and Fall of the Three Great Cities of Spice
Michael Krondl
Ballantine Books
ISBN: 034548083X

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From the Author's Website:

The Taste of Conquest tells the story of the legendary players in this global tale: of the ruthless merchants of Venice, of the conquistadors of Lisbon, and the single-minded businessmen of Amsterdam. It's a story about food, greed fashion and conquest.










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