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This recipe is meant to be used for goose, though it works quite well with chicken - in fact, I like it better with chicken than goose. The fruit that was used as a stuffing during roasting becomes a sort of sauce or chutney for the meat.

1 roasting chicken, approx 4 lbs.
1 pear
1 quince
1 cup grapes
1 Tbsp. parsley
1 tsp. sage
1/2 tsp. savory
1 clove garlic

2 Tbsp. pan drippings from the chicken
2 Tbsp. wine
1/2 tsp. powder douce
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. galingale

Place whole chicken in a large roasting pan - preferably one with a cover.

Peel, core, and chop the quince and pear into quarter inch pieces. Parboil them until just tender and drain. The original recipe does not say to do this, but I find that the quince and sometimes the pear don't get cooked enough while the chicken is being roasted. If the pear is soft and ripe enough to eat raw then don't parboil it with the quince.

Place fruit, herbs, and spices into a large bowl and mix well. Stuff into the chicken, cover, and roast at 350° until done - about 2 hours.

Remove fruit from chicken and place in a saucepan over medium heat. Add drippings from chicken, wine, powder douce, salt, and galingale. Cook until heated through. Serve hot.

Source [Forme of Cury, S. Pegge (ed.)]: Sawse Madame. XXX. Take sawge. persel. ysope. and saueray. quinces. and peeres, garlek and Grapes. and fylle the gees þerwith. and sowe the hole þat no grece come out. and roost hem wel. and kepe the grece þat fallith þerof. take galytyne and grece and do in a possynet, whan the gees buth rosted ynowh; take an smyte hem on pecys. and þat tat is withinne and do it in a possynet and put þerinne wyne if it be to thyk. do þerto powdour of galyngale. powdour douce and salt and boyle the sawse and dresse þe Gees in disshes and lay þe sowe onoward.

Source [MS Harley 5401, S. Wallace (trans.)]: Sauce Madame. Recipe sauge, percely, ysop & saueray, quyncis, gode perys, & garlic, & put in þe gosse, & sew þe hole agayn þat no grece go oute; & roste it & leye þe grece þat drops fro þe sawce & etc.

Source [A Noble Boke off Cookry (Holkham MSS 674), R. Napier (ed.)]: To mak sauce madame tak the tharmes of a gose and slit them and shave them clene then tak the gossern the wings the skyn and the soule of the gose and put them all in a pot with mynced onyons mynced wardens and grapes rostid then rost hir and smyt hir in peces and lay here in a chargiour and put the farser in a pot put ther to wyn and sesson it up with pouder and salt and venygar and thou wilt thou may tak yolks of egges sodene herd and cromyd smalle and put ther to and let it be salt and pour it on the peces and serue it.

Source [Liber cure cocorum, T. Gloning (ed.)]: Sawce madame. Take sawge, persoly, ysope, saveray, Onyons gode, peres, garlek, I say, And grapes. go fille þy gose þenne And sew þy hole, no grece oute renne. Lay hur to fyre and rost hyr browne, And kepe þo grece þat falles doune. Take galingale and þo grece þat renne, Do hit in posnet, as I þe kenne. Whenne þo gose is rostyd, take hir away, Smyte hir in pesys, I þe pray. Þat is within, þou schalle take oute, Kest in þy posnet with outene doute. 3if hit is thyke do þerto wyne, And powder of galingale þat is fyne, And powder dowce and salt also. Boyle alle togeder er þou fyr go, In a dysshe þy gose þou close Þe sawce abofe, as I suppose.

Published: March 1, 2009



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