xliiij - Mortrewys de Fleyssh
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books (England, 1430), entitled "xliiij - Mortrewys de Fleyssh". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

xliiij - Mortrewys de Fleyssh. Take Porke, an sethe it wyl; thanne take it vppe and pulle a-way the Swerde, (Note: Rind, skin) an pyke owt the bonys, an hakke it and grynd it smal; thenne take the sylf brothe, and temper it with ale; then take fayre gratyd brede, and do ther-to, an sethe it, an coloure it with Saffroun, and lye it with 3olkys of eyroun, and make it euen Salt, and caste pouder Gyngere, a-bouyn on the dysshe.


Translation
Translated into modern English [experimental machine translation - replace with a proper translation], this becomes:

Xliiij - mortrewys of fleyssh. take porke, an boil it will ; then take it vppe and pulle a-way the swerde, (note: rind, skin) an pyke out the bonys, an hakke it and grind it small ; then take the sylf broth , and temper it with ale; then take fair gratyd bread , and do there -to, an boil it, an color it with saffron , and lye it with yolks of eggs , and make it euen salt, and cast powder ginger , a-bouyn on the dish. .


Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Mortrews de chare. Take hennes and fresshe porke, y þe kenne, Sethe hom togedur alwayes þenne. Take hem up, pyke out þe bonys, Enbande þe porke, Syr, for þo nonys. Hew hit smalle and grynde hit wele, Cast it agayne, so have þou cele, In to þe brothe, and charge hit þenne With myed wastelle, as I þe kenne. Colour hit with safron, at þat tyde. Boyle hit and set hit doune be syde. Lye hit with 3olkes of eren ry3t, And florysshe þy dysshe with pouder þou my3t. [Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]]

Mortreus de Chare. Take porke, and seth it ynow; and take it vppe, and bawde hit, and hewe it and grinde it, and in a morter; And cast thereto grated brede, and then drawe the same broth thorgh a streynour, And temper hit with ale, and do al into a potte, and lete boile, and aley hit with yolkes of egges, And then lete it boile no more, And caste thereto powder of ginger, Salt, And put hit in disshes in maner of Mortrewes, And cast thereto powder of ginger, and serue it forth. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

pork
bread
saffron
yolk
egg
salt
ginger


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:44>. Accessed on October 23, 2017, 11:46 am.

Searchable index of "Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?liber:9>. Accessed on October 23, 2017, 11:46 am.




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